Dec 14, 2013

Hollywood Has Trouble Keeping Up With Technology, Too
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Let’s face it, marketing has evolved.

If an individual consultant, small business, corporation, and yes, even a Hollywood movie are still debating on whether they need to be dabbling in digital platforms, they are operating at their own risk.

Save for governments, print firms, and old school traditionalists, the fax is all but dead. Emails are basically used for follow up, and the telephone has been replaced by texting, web conferencing, and instant messages.

Gone are the days of being able to operate without a computer. Yes, you still need to have face-to-face meetings, to sell products in stores, and to put bums in seats at the theater and stadium. But if your marketing and public relations plan consists solely of sending press releases to newspaper, radio, and television stations or printing brochures, you may as well hand your keys over to the bank right now.

It’s not as if you have to go crazy and spend a gazillion dollars on a campaign. You just have to get creative, or at the very least, find out who your fans are and engage with them.

But let’s get back to the Hollywood example.

The average movie costs about $100,000 to make. Factor in animation and those blockbuster storylines, and the bill moves upwards to $200,000 and more.

A scan of any (two-star) average movie’s rolling credits at the end will give you an idea of how many people are involved with a film. Search the same film on IMDb and see a bigger list. Chances are those hundreds of names do not include a transmedia director. They might not include a marketing director, but you know the bigger budget films have to have them.

There have been a few movies that have successfully created a buzz prior and during their release. They managed to stay on the big screen for weeks on end.

But most movies fall out of the theater after two weeks. They seem to have only the token poster, trailer, and static (maybe a Flash) website for promotion. Unless by chance, it’s a flick that really made an impact with the audience, like the Blair Witch Project. That production cost almost nothing to make, but it still used the Internet to infer the film was based on a true story.

You can tell how well a movie will do at the box office after the first weekend. If it tanks — maybe there were extenuating circumstances — it can make up for the shortfall on the second weekend. If sales continue to dwindle, then it likely falls off the marquis.

But the theater is not the only place a film can make money. At minimum, there is Pay-Per-View, DVDs, and Netflix. However, there are many other revenue possibilities, such as apps, games, and other technology products. How well it does will depend on the strength of its marketing team and the vision of its producers.

Now let’s step back outside of Hollywood and check out the business world. Does all of this sound familiar?

 

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Debbie Elicksen

Social Media, transmedia, media liaison.

Experience in working with high profile celebrities, communications (writing and editing for print, web, and radio), project management, marketing and communications strategy, public relations, content creation, publishing, both sides of media relations.

Communities (active and engaged in with good followings): Stage 32, Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, LinkedIn, and Pinterest.

Media (in front and behind the microphone): Hangouts on Air, traditional and online radio, physical and online newspapers/magazines, television, webcasts, webinars, public address, speaking and facilitation

I have over 20 years of direct media experience, including working in television and Internet media, print, and radio.

I have been a professional sports writer and covered the National Hockey League for over 20 years for several publications and sports services, including NBCSports.com. I was the first woman to ever headman a football conference in Canada (Prairie Football Conference), was PR Director for the Edmonton Trappers Baseball Club, and was a volunteer media liaison with the Hockey Committee during the 1988 Olympic Winter Games.

Over the years, I have worked with and interviewed numerous media and celebrities, such as Stan Fischler (The Hockey Maven), Wayne Gretzky, Jarome Iginla, Mario Lemieux, Marcus Camby, Gordie Howe, Bobby Orr, Kelly Hrudey, The Doobie Brothers, Dante Bichette, to name a few. I have appeared in many local, national, and international media programs, such as The Vicki Gabereau Show, NHL Network, MSG Network, and Sports Channel America, to name a few.

I co-host the Virtual Newsmakers with Cynthia K. Seymour. It is a weekly webcast featuring interesting people who are using innovative ways to bridge traditional and digital communications. Some of our guest include thought leaders in digital media communications, such as Erik Qualman, Chris Brogan, Martin Shervington, Dave Carroll (United Breaks Guitars), Tony Dyson (creator of R2D2), and three-time Olympian Steve Mesler.
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Debbie Elicksen

Social Media, transmedia, media liaison. Experience in working with high profile celebrities, communications (writing and editing for print, web, and radio), project management, marketing and communications strategy, public relations, content creation, publishing, both sides of media relations. Communities (active and engaged in with good followings): Stage 32, Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, LinkedIn, and Pinterest. Media (in front and behind the microphone): Hangouts on Air, traditional and online radio, physical and online newspapers/magazines, television, webcasts, webinars, public address, speaking and facilitation I have over 20 years of direct media experience, including working in television and Internet media, print, and radio. I have been a professional sports writer and covered the National Hockey League for over 20 years for several publications and sports services, including NBCSports.com. I was the first woman to ever headman a football conference in Canada (Prairie Football Conference), was PR Director for the Edmonton Trappers Baseball Club, and was a volunteer media liaison with the Hockey Committee during the 1988 Olympic Winter Games. Over the years, I have worked with and interviewed numerous media and celebrities, such as Stan Fischler (The Hockey Maven), Wayne Gretzky, Jarome Iginla, Mario Lemieux, Marcus Camby, Gordie Howe, Bobby Orr, Kelly Hrudey, The Doobie Brothers, Dante Bichette, to name a few. I have appeared in many local, national, and international media programs, such as The Vicki Gabereau Show, NHL Network, MSG Network, and Sports Channel America, to name a few. I co-host the Virtual Newsmakers with Cynthia K. Seymour. It is a weekly webcast featuring interesting people who are using innovative ways to bridge traditional and digital communications. Some of our guest include thought leaders in digital media communications, such as Erik Qualman, Chris Brogan, Martin Shervington, Dave Carroll (United Breaks Guitars), Tony Dyson (creator of R2D2), and three-time Olympian Steve Mesler.

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