Jul 9, 2011

End of shuttle program could be boon for startup SpaceX, others
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Written by : Tom George| 0 | Technology

Via Scoop.itNew Space: A New Era In Space Exploration

(Reuters) – After the U.S. space shuttle program ends this month, NASA will rely on Russia and its Soyuz craft to deliver Americans to the International Space Station — at a cost of more than $50 million a seat.

That could change relatively soon as three companies develop commercial space taxis to launch from the United StatesBoeing Co, Space Exploration Technologies, also known as SpaceX, and Sierra Nevada Corp.
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Tom George

Founder and CEO of Internet Billboards. A futurist and serial entrepreneur, as well as a professional fitness trainer, martial artist, and business strategist. Helped to develop inbound advertising. An avid content curator who enjoys finding those digital gems out there in cyberspace and sharing them with others.
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  • Boeing and SpaceX both believe they should be ready for a crewed test of their two respective vehicles in about 3 years. Sierra Nevada’s Dream Chaser winged vehicle is coming along quite nicely as well. Unfortunately, all of this could be jeopardized by the House Appropriations Committee’s latest ill-advised recommendations to cut NASA’s FY2012 Budget by as much as $2 billion. The proposed budget cuts would also cancel the James Webb Space Telescope; the Hubble telescope’s embattled successor. It’s true that the JWST is behind schedule and the victim of serious program mismanagement, but
    this in itself does not fully justify the cancellation of a project that could
    potentially contribute as much to our understanding of astrophysics and cosmology as the Hubble itself did. If Congress is really serious about budget cuts, then they should consider the so-called Space Launch System; a proposed Super Heavy Lift Vehicle that the Senate is
    compelling NASA to develop even though said vehicle as of this date has no clearly defined mission. In addition, each launch  of the SLS is
    projected to cost taxpayers as much as $1 BILLION!  If we really need
    heavy lift that badly then let’s purchase it from private industry for a
    much more reasonable cost. The proposed Falcon Heavy from SpaceX will lift 53 metric tons to low earth orbit for about $125 million per
    flight. 53 metric tons is less than half the proposed tonnage of the
    SLS, but I’m betting that if we could erect a giant 347-foot long space
    station in low earth orbit with less than 30 tons per mission using the Space Shuttle, then 53 tons per flight to the same destination should be more than enough.

    • Stratocumulus this is really fascinating, I am getting educated here a little on the subject, but it is both interesting and intriguing. You really are a wealth of information on this subject. We at Internet Billboards really would be honored if you could be an aerospace curator. I can except original content from you and also allow your scoops to be posted. Please if you haven’t registered here yet please do, I can tell when it comes to space your the man. Thanks for this cool read.  


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Tom George

Founder and CEO of Internet Billboards. A futurist and serial entrepreneur, as well as a professional fitness trainer, martial artist, and business strategist. Helped to develop inbound advertising. An avid content curator who enjoys finding those digital gems out there in cyberspace and sharing them with others.

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